Posted by: riverchilde | February 22, 2011

RIP blogs, long live Twitter?

Another reminder that when technology becomes popular with the 35+ set, the younger generation abandons it. (Whitewater ahead!)

This trend is reflective of two situations described by Clay Shirky in Here Comes Everybody. First, “the limits of human cognition will mean that scale alone will kill conversation” (p. 95). These limits reflect the time constraints on the part of both reader and writer. Second, as Sue Rosenstock, spokeswoman for LiveJournal, phrases it in this article, too often “broadcasting” (Shirky’s phrase) a blog feels like “writing into the abyss.”  (Been feeling both those effects myself this week, how about you?)

My headline to the contrary, I don’t believe blogging is on its deathbed. A blog’s value lies in its usefulness to a community of practice–that is, those who do what they do out of deep love for their subject (Shirky, Chapter 4). The choice of media becomes a matter of depth of engagement. Ever try to have a complex conversation on Twitter or Facebook? Get thee to a blog, my friend.

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Responses

  1. Complex conversation on Twitter? Maybe not. But meaningful? More than you’d think. Complete strangers on Twitter offered prayers when I posted about a health situation with a family member. I’ve read countless book and film recommendations that led me to further exploring Rather than the character limit preventing meaningful exchange, it forces you to make every single character count.

    This blog by Roger Ebert (my personal favorite Twitter convert) might explain it best:
    http://blogs.suntimes.com/ebert/2010/06/tweet_tweet_tweet.html


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